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    Our workshop program provides training and teaching in topics across geochemistry and related fields.

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Workshops

Our workshop program provides training and teaching in topics across geochemistry and related fields.

NameDateOrganisersPrice
Crystallization via non-classical pathways Details 20 Jun - 21 Jun Xin Zhang (PNNL), Pupa Gilbert (University of Wisconsin - Madison), Qian Chen (UIUC) US$120
Geochemical Modelling Workshop. Using PHREEQC for laboratory and industrial applications. Details 20 Jun - 21 Jun Julien Declercq, Mike Herrell US$300
LA-ICP-MS Data Reduction using LADR Details 20 Jun - 21 Jun Dr Ashley Norris, Prof Leonid V. Danyushevsky US$90
Modeling element diffusion in high temperature systems: a practical introduction to geospeedometry Details 20 Jun - 21 Jun Thomas Shea, Sumit Chakraborty, Maren Kahl, Kendra Lynn, Fidel Costa US$150
New Trends in Laser Ablation-Based Techniques for Direct Solid Sample Chemical Analysis Details 20 Jun Jhanis J Gonzalez, Alan Koenig US$100
Reactive Transport Modeling in Geochemical Systems Details 20 Jun - 21 Jun Craig Bethke, Brian Farrell, Qusheng Jin, Jia Wang US$100
The Magma Chamber Simulator (MCS): An Open-System Phase Equilibria Modeling Tool for Magma Recharge, Crustal Assimilation/Stoping and Crystallization (RASFC) Details 20 Jun - 21 Jun Melissa Scruggs, Wendy Bohrson, Valerie Strasser US$160
Thermodynamic Modeling of Magmatic Systems with alphaMELTS2 Details 20 Jun - 21 Jun Paula Antoshechkina, Paul Asimow US$125/US$65
Clear, Concise and Confident: Creating Impact In Your Goldschmidt Presentation Details 21 Jun Alice Williams, Edel O'Sullivan US$20/US$30
Applications of isotope tracers to geochemical kinetics studies Details 21 Jun Chen Zhu, Jim Kubicki US$100
ArAR Argon Age Recalcuation: The how and why of recalculating Ar/Ar geochronology Details 21 Jun Aisha Al Suwaidi, Courtney Sprain, Cameron Mercer US$60
Assessing Contaminant Sources/Release Ages and Aquifer Continuity in Soil/Groundwater Systems using Stable Radiogenic Isotopes of Strontium (Sr) and Lead (Pb) Details 21 Jun Richard W. Hurst US$198
Earth Science meets Data Science - Services & Systems, Policies & Procedures, Tools & Techniques for Geochemistry Details 21 Jun Kerstin Lehnert, Shaunna Morrison, Lucia Profeta US$60
Raman on the Rocks Details 21 Jun Dr. Ding Shuo, Dr. Jan Toporski
Student Engagement in Higher Education - Lead Laurent Valentin Details 23 Jun Laurent Valentin US$10
Communicating Science - Adina Paytan Details 25 Jun Adina Paytan US$10
Crystallization via non-classical pathways

Crystallization via non-classical pathways

Saturday 20th June 08:30 - Sunday 21st June 17:00
Contacts: Xin Zhang (PNNL), Pupa Gilbert (University of Wisconsin - Madison), Qian Chen (UIUC)
Price: US$120

Crystallization via non-classical pathways is important during the formation of minerals in nature and has become to a popular method to synthesize advanced materials at both the lab and industrial scales. Unlike either classical crystal growth pathway via monomer-by-monomer addition or Ostwald ripening, crystallization via non-classical pathways such as particle-by-particle attachment can form bigger crystals, faster. Up to now, plentiful materials prepared via classical crystallization have been applied in various fields such as energy, catalysis, biomedicine, optics, electrics, and magnetics. Understanding crystallization via non-classical pathways could provide new insights on design and synthesis of novel materials. The workshop aims to bring to researchers updated information on the fundamental non-classical crystallization research, including theory and experiments. It is also designed for the experienced researchers to reinforce their knowledge on the scopes of development of new techniques, especially state-of-the-art in situ characterization tools, to understand mechanisms of crystallization via non-classical pathways. The topics that would be covered in this workshop include: ● Non-classical nucleation ● Crystallization via cluster aggregation ● Mineral formation from amorphous precursors ● Biomineralization via non-classical pathways ● Particle-based crystallization, such as oriented attachment and mesocrystals ● Observation of the non-classical crystallization pathways via in situ techniques ● Theoretical developments to simulate non-classical crystallization


Geochemical Modelling Workshop. Using PHREEQC for laboratory and industrial applications.

Saturday 20th June 08:30 - Sunday 21st June 17:00
Contacts: Julien Declercq, Mike Herrell
Price: US$300

This two-day workshop will provide an introduction to geochemical modelling and the USGS geochemical / thermodynamic modelling code PHREEQC (PH, REdox, EQuilibrium, Code). PHREEQC is a free, well-supported software code and one of the most, if not the most, widely used code amongst academia and industry for thermodynamic modelling applications. During the two-day workshop, we will present the different geochemical modelling steps, from the definition of a conceptual model to the geochemical calculations within PHREEQC. We will also present exercises drawn from the presenters’ experiences, both in a laboratory setting and applied industrial setting. The workshop will take place in four sessions split over the two days. The first day will provide an introduction to geochemical models, the conceptualisation of the problems, and an overview of the thermodynamics that govern PHREEQC and the definitions within the databases. We will make a point of discussing the thermodynamic databases available within PHREEQC, their issues and the possible ways to overcome these. We will also provide the basic skills needed to use PHREEQC, including the definition of inputs and outputs, of solid and aqueous solutions, and of the reactions and equilibrium calculations. The second day will provide a more in-depth look at the possibilities offered by PHREEQC in terms of kinetic, transport, and sorption calculations. The aim is to develop an understanding of how to extract the equations defining the reactivity of mineralogical phases from the literature or experimental data and integrate these into PHREEQC. We will then show you how to use sorption experiments to define attenuation equations and sorption blocks in the program and provide an introduction to transport simulations. The workshop will finish with a general discussion. Intended Audience: This course is intended for students, researchers, and professionals using or planning to use PHREEQC to model and predict the results of geochemical operations, from simulation of laboratory experiments to natural settings (such as groundwater interaction with bedrock, simulating field data and predicting water quality). Attendees are encouraged to bring with them their own examples of natural or laboratory systems that they wish to model for discussion with the session tutors.


LA-ICP-MS Data Reduction using LADR

Saturday 20th June 08:30 - Sunday 21st June 17:00
Contacts: Dr Ashley Norris, Prof Leonid V. Danyushevsky
Website
Price: US$90

LADR, pronounced “ladder”, is desktop software for data reduction of laser ablation ICP–MS data sets. Developed by the CODES Analytical Laboratories at the University of Tasmania, LADR is available by subscription from Norris Scientific. A time-limited evaluation version can be downloaded from the product website. The LADR program is able to load data files from all makes and models of ICP–MS instruments, and is compatible with all laser ablation platforms. As well as performing basic data reduction calculations, LADR can: identify and remove transient spikes; correct for interferences; model variations in gas blank intensity; synchronise analysis intervals with laser firing time; model and correct for down hole fractionation; model calibration drift; use secondary standards to correct for matrix effects; add unmeasured elements by stoichiometry; quantify to an analytical total; support mixed quantification routines within a data set; and most importantly, apply a robust error propagation from all sources of uncertainty. The workshop is intended for both current LADR users as well as any laser ablation analyst wanting to learn more about how the software works and what features it provides. Workshopped examples will include trace element analysis, UPb geochronology, and quantified elemental mapping. Time permitting, group discussion of general data reduction concepts and LADR design concepts will be encouraged. Attendees are asked to bring a laptop computer capable of running a Windows OS (either natively or in a VM) so they can use the software during the workshop and follow along with the demonstrations and discussion.


Modeling element diffusion in high temperature systems: a practical introduction to geospeedometry

Modeling element diffusion in high temperature systems: a practical introduction to geospeedometry

Saturday 20th June 08:30 - Sunday 21st June 17:00
Contacts: Thomas Shea, Sumit Chakraborty, Maren Kahl, Kendra Lynn, Fidel Costa
Price: US$150

Geospeedometry, the science of extracting timescale information from element diffusion in minerals and melts has undergone a major surge in igneous and metamorphic petrology over the last two decades. As analytical and computational tools are improving quickly, applications of diffusion chronometry leveraging multiple elements (majors, minor and traces) in the same mineral or melt are becoming routine. Be part of this exciting and rapidly developing field and join us for a two-day workshop covering the underlying principles, analytical and numerical techniques, and uncertainties in applying diffusion modeling to magmatic and metamorphic systems. We will cover some basic background through a series of short talks, but mostly, emphasis will be put on gaining practical coding skills to start your own diffusion models using Excel®, and trying out more sophisticated programming tools like Matlab®. Several exercises encompassing analytical solutions and numerical finite differencing in 1D (and potentially 2D), all grounded in real case studies, will be utilized. We will also discuss uncertainties, potential pitfalls, unsolved diffusion mysteries, and areas that we as a community can help improve on in the years to come. The workshop is also co-organized by metamorphic petrology and diffusion expert Wali Faryad.


New Trends in Laser Ablation-Based Techniques for Direct Solid Sample Chemical Analysis

Saturday 20th June 08:30-16:30
Contacts: Jhanis J Gonzalez, Alan Koenig
Price: US$100

The workshop covers new trends on Laser Ablation-Based techniques used for the direct analysis of solid samples. The focused techniques are: Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectroscopy (LAMIS), Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectroscopy (LA-ICP-OES) and Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) and the combination of them to use in tandem.


Reactive Transport Modeling in Geochemical Systems

Reactive Transport Modeling in Geochemical Systems

Saturday 20th June 08:30 - Sunday 21st June 17:00
Contacts: Craig Bethke, Brian Farrell, Qusheng Jin, Jia Wang
Website
Price: US$100

For the seventh year in a row, we are offering an active-learning workshop on the subject of Reactive Transport Modeling at the 2020 Goldschmidt Conference. Following a fully hands-on format, participants will learn to construct, trace, and interpret models of transport in reacting geochemical systems using The Geochemist's Workbench®. Specific topics covered include: • Introduction to geochemical modeling • Transport in flowing groundwater • Dual porosity models (stagnant zones) • Kd, Freundlich, and Langmuir sorption • Surface complexation • Colloid-facilitated transport • Reaction kinetics • Biodegradation • Dissolution and precipitation • Microbial catalysis and growth • Effective graphical presentation • Creating animation and video. The topics will be illustrated through a series of case studies.


The Magma Chamber Simulator (MCS): An Open-System Phase Equilibria Modeling Tool for Magma Recharge, Crustal Assimilation/Stoping and Crystallization (RASFC)

Saturday 20th June 08:30 - Sunday 21st June 17:00
Contacts: Melissa Scruggs, Wendy Bohrson, Valerie Strasser
Website
Price: US$160

The past two decades have seen an increase in the use of phase-equilibria modeling to interpret geochemical and petrological data. Although phase-equilibria modeling programs have traditionally been used to model melting and crystallization processes, the Magma Chamber Simulator (MCS) - an energy- and mass-constrained computer code (Bohrson et al. 2014) - offers phase equilibria modeling for open-systems, like recharge/magma mixing (including crystal/mush entrainment), assimilation of crustal partial melts, wallrock stoping, and crystal and/or fluid fractionation (RASFC). For a magma body, MCS tracks the thermal, mass, and compositional (major and trace element, isotope, and phase equilibria) evolution as magma undergoes serial and/or concurrent RASFC processes. Participants will do hands-on exercises to become familiar with operating the MCS code and will also explore the tabular and graphical output that is produced as an MCS model result. In addition, we will explore numerous RASFC case studies in-depth, enabling the user to develop a deeper understanding of the range of petrological/geochemical problems that can be addressed. MCS models are a useful accompaniment to geochemical, volcanological and petrological studies, and can be used as a teaching tool in petrology/geochemistry classes. Petrologists of all levels are encouraged to join. By the end of the two-day workshop, participants will be well-versed in the MCS user interface and ready to apply MCS to specific petrologic/geochemical research questions, or use it as a teaching tool. To preview the MCS, go to: http://mcs.geol.ucsb.edu/. Please consider joining us in Hawaii, where we will offer training on the latest MCS release.


Thermodynamic Modeling of Magmatic Systems with alphaMELTS2

Thermodynamic Modeling of Magmatic Systems with alphaMELTS2

Saturday 20th June 08:30 - Sunday 21st June 17:00
Contacts: Paula Antoshechkina, Paul Asimow
Website
Price: US$125/US$65

The MELTS family of algorithms is widely used by petrologists and geochemists to predict the outcomes of melting and crystallization processes, to compare with experiments or to design experimental campaigns, to assess the energy budgets of igneous processes, to teach the principles of igneous petrology, and more. Although there are a variety of ways to access such models, this workshop will focus on the newly released alphaMELTS 2 interface, and alphaMELTS for MATLAB/Python. alphaMELTS 2 is a text-based front end to the Rhyolite-MELTS, pMELTS, and pHMELTS models, with built-in trace element calculations and a variety of unique features and workflows. (Note that no commercial software is required for the workshop; access to alphaMELTS from MATLAB or Python is near-identical, so users may select one or the other.) This two-day workshop will be structured to appeal to a wide range of users, who may choose to attend either one or both days. Day 1 will focus on introductory material and basic functionality for new users, whereas Day 2 will focus on the latest features, more advanced or larger-scale calculations, and special problems suggested by attendees. Day 1 will constitute sufficient preparation for a novice to be able to appreciate Day 2. Instructors Paul Asimow and Paula Antoshechkina from Caltech are the designers and maintainers of alphaMELTS 2, and related software, and will cover software installation as well as some undocumented tricks that are important to getting reliable results from MELTS calculations.


Clear, Concise and Confident: Creating Impact In Your Goldschmidt Presentation

Sunday 21st June 08:00-17:00
Contacts: Alice Williams, Edel O'Sullivan
Price: US$20/US$30

Does the idea of speaking at a conference send a chill down your spine? Do you feel like a “deer in the headlights”, your message lost in a trembling voice or a blank mind? Do you find it challenging to create clarity in your slides and in your words? This two-part workshop* aims to help participants to polish and perfect their presentations, build their self-confidence and “warm up” their voices to be heard at Goldschmidt 2020.
Part One - Overcoming Fear in Public-speaking The fear of public speaking is a very real and very debilitating situation for many people, and can present a major challenge in reaching career goals, both academic and non-academic. In today’s ultra-competitive world, confidence in presentations can represent a fine line between success and “try again.” In this interactive morning session, we will focus on identifying the primary reasons and triggers for fears in public speaking and address them with a combination of theoretical and practical methods to overcome fear, which can be continued and advanced by participants in their own time.
Part Two - Polishing your Goldschmidt Presentation In the afternoon, participants will be able to put into practice some of the techniques learnt, in rehearsals of their Goldschmidt orals, posters and flash talks. Working in small, friendly groups led by postdocs and senior grad students, participants will have the opportunity to get feedback on their presentations and to discuss tips and techniques for designing, structuring and delivering an effective scientific presentation. Help will be on hand for participants for whom English is not their first language, and a workshop manual will be provided in advance to help participants prepare their Goldschmidt presentation before arrival in Honolulu.
*Participants may register for one or both parts of the workshop. The ticket for one part is $20, the ticket for both parts is $30


Applications of isotope tracers to geochemical kinetics studies

Applications of isotope tracers to geochemical kinetics studies

Sunday 21st June 08:30-17:00
Contacts: Chen Zhu, Jim Kubicki
Website
Price: US$100

The isotope tracer method promises detection that is orders of magnitude more sensitive than the conventional method that uses concentrations (e.g., Si, Al) to measure reaction rates. The method introduces an enriched rare isotope of an element to an experimental solution that is interacting with a mineral or a suite of minerals that have normal or natural isotopic compositions. Although the method itself is not new, MC-ICP-MS technologies now make the measurement of many non-traditional isotopes accessible. The first objective of this workshop is to impart the methods and skills of designing, preparing, and interpreting experiments. The workshop will also provide a venue to link participants with laboratories that possess capabilities for analysis of non-traditional stable isotopes through short presentations and posters from the labs. The second objective of the workshop is to discuss various topics pertinent to the effective uses of the isotope tracer method in geochemical kinetics studies. These topics may include potential innovative experimental designs and theoretical models, as well as potential pitfalls. We plan to discuss with GCA or Chemical Geology the possibility of a cluster of papers. We will also discuss a possible proposal to the NSF Research Coordination Network program.


ArAR Argon Age Recalcuation: The how and why of recalculating Ar/Ar geochronology

Sunday 21st June 08:30-17:00
Contacts: Aisha Al Suwaidi, Courtney Sprain, Cameron Mercer
Price: US$60

Although the 40Ar/39Ar geochronology method has been applied extensively since its development, significant improvements in our understanding, specifically of the decay constants and isotopic abundances have occurred. In this workshop participants will examine older 40Ar/39Ar and K-Ar ages and explore how and why we need to correct these ages to newer decay constants and isotopic abundances. We will take participants through the process of identifying key data required for the recalculation and explain all of the key elements required to decide which decay constant and isotopic abundance you will need to work with. Finally, participants will learn how to use Kernal Density Estimation (KDE) to understand the geochronological data.


Assessing Contaminant Sources/Release Ages and Aquifer Continuity in Soil/Groundwater Systems using Stable Radiogenic Isotopes of Strontium (Sr) and Lead (Pb)

Assessing Contaminant Sources/Release Ages and Aquifer Continuity in Soil/Groundwater Systems using Stable Radiogenic Isotopes of Strontium (Sr) and Lead (Pb)

Sunday 21st June 08:30-17:00
Contacts: Richard W. Hurst
Price: US$198

This course is intended to serve the needs of: (1) Faculty with interests in environmental research and introducing their students to new approaches regarding investigating environmental issues; (2) environmental consultants, the private sector, and regulatory professionals who must resolve issues associated with site contamination, commingled plumes, potential sources/degradation of contaminants of concern, as well as site remediation on a regular basis; and (3) upper division undergraduate and graduate students in the Earth/Environmental or related sciences with an interest in hydrogeological/environmental careers. Fundamental concepts of Sr/Pb isotopes and allied methodologies (e.g., light stable isotopes, gas chromatography, etc.) are covered followed by specific case studies that exemplify their application to site-specific situations predominantly in the United States, Canada, Europe, and South America Topics to be covered include soil/groundwater contamination, estimating the age of fugitive releases when possible, tracing groundwater flow, and evaluating aquifer continuity. The potential of these methods to assist in the resolution of environmental/hydrogeologic issues globally have yet to be realized, and I trust this course will spark the interest of delegates attending to implement these technologies.


Earth Science meets Data Science - Services & Systems, Policies & Procedures, Tools & Techniques for Geochemistry

Sunday 21st June 08:30-17:00
Contacts: Kerstin Lehnert, Shaunna Morrison, Lucia Profeta
Price: US$60

Data management, data access, and data analysis are now central to scientific research in geochemistry, petrology, and mineralogy. Researchers today need to generate data management plans for their proposals; manage and document their data so they can be reused; submit data to a public repository to comply with funders' and journals' policies for Open and FAIR data; gather data from distributed sources and wrangle them into coherent, large-scale datasets; and mine, visualize, and perform statistical analyses on these datasets to find answers to their science questions. This workshop is intended to provide researchers, especially early career scientists, a forum to learn about and discuss best practices, methods, and tools for data management, data publication, and data citation; data discovery and access; and data mining, data visualization, and statistical analysis. The workshop will consist of multiple modules that focus on these different topics, with presentations, exercises, and time for group discussions. We will invite participants to think creatively about new ways to interact with the data and develop research applications and encourage them to contribute scientific use cases around which breakout groups can form.


Raman on the Rocks

Sunday 21st June 08:30-17:00
Contacts: Dr. Ding Shuo, Dr. Jan Toporski

BOOKING OPEN SOON. The workshop will provide an overview of the underlying priniciples of confocal microscopy and Raman spectroscopy in general. This will be backed by some yet to be defined user talks illustrating the scientific benefit of the method of confocal Raman microscopy per se, which will further be illustrated with a fully operational system. The latter will of course be a WITec system, but irrespective of that, the workshop will be open for users of any other Raman Instrument. The structure of the workshop will be a combination of presentations and hands-on demonstrations over the course of a day. This will include: - An introduction to the method of 3D Confocal Raman Microscopy - An overview of technical requirements and system performance factors - Presentations by experienced researchers applying Confocal Raman Microscopy to provide examples from “real-world geoscience research” - Examples of correlative studies using confocal Raman microscopy and SEM - Hands-on instrument demonstrations and measurements - Hands-on software demonstrations, data analysis and evaluation, 2D/3D image generation, use of database, etc.


Student Engagement in Higher Education - Lead Laurent Valentin

Tuesday 23rd June 12:45-14:00
Contacts: Laurent Valentin
Location: 318A+B View on map
Price: US$10

Student engagement (SE) is what a student brings to Higher Education in terms of goals, aspirations and values and how these are shaped by their experience as students. These include 1) Expressing individual opinions and ideas, 2) Taking an active role in academic life, 3) Collaborating with staff and students in decision-making over both the process and outcome. There are many different examples of students and staff working in partnership to co-create learning and teaching experiences. These initiatives include examples of students as co-researchers, students as change agents, students as consultants and students as co-creators of curricula. This workshop is designed to provide guidance and strategies for students and academic staff wishing to initiate, sustain or extend student-staff partnerships. The aims of the workshop are threefold, i) explore the ways in which students act as partners in learning and teaching, ii) identify strategic and sustainable practices of engaging students as partners, iii) discuss the risks and challenges inherent to partnership and find suggestions for addressing them.


Communicating Science - Adina Paytan

Thursday 25th June 12:45-14:00
Contacts: Adina Paytan
Location: 319A+B View on map
Price: US$10

Most scientists don't have the training or connections they need to communicate about their work beyond their peers. This workshop will introduce scientists to tools they need to make their communication more effective. The training begins with a brief overview of communications principles, and then introduces the Message Box and the idea of tailoring your message to your audience. The training culminates with media interview scenarios.


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Tel: +44 1223 852663. Email: helpdesk@goldschmidt.info

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