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Abstract Details

Identifying Water Sources and Reassessing Aquifer Boundaries in West Hawaiʻi, USA

Tachera D, Lautze N, Dulai H, Shuler C & Thomas D

Tachera D, Lautze N, Dulai H, Shuler C & Thomas D (2020) Goldschmidt Abstracts, 2020 2525

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13e: Room 4, View in program

Diamond Tachera
Nicole Lautze
Henrietta Dulai View all 3 abstracts at Goldschmidt2020
Christopher Shuler
Donald Thomas View all 3 abstracts at Goldschmidt2020

Listed below are questions that have been submitted by the community that the author will try and cover in their presentation. To submit a question, ensure you are signed in to the website. Authors or session conveners approve questions before they are displayed here.

Submitted by Kip Solomon on
Thank you for your presentation. In some systems high elevation precipitation (with depleted stable isotopes) flow in streams to lower elevations and then infiltrates to become groundwater recharge. Is this a possibility at your site? Perhaps the surface water drainage network is not well developed. Thank you.


Submitted by Rolf Kipfer on
Dear Diamond Thanks, your insights on how to use stable isotopes to constrain recharge altitudes of ground waters on Big Island. Did you ever encounter 'strange, strongly depleted' isotopic values that could not be explained by the topography of Big Island? I ask as such data were reported from other Hawaiian island. I am not a specialist on stable isotopes, so apologize my ignorance. But, why do you base your analysis on ?18O and not on ?D which is far less subject to water-rock exchange than ?18O? All the best - Rolf Kipfer (RoKi)


Submitted by Rolf Kipfer on
Dear Diamond Thanks, for your insights on the use stable isotopes to constrain recharge altitudes of groundwaters on Big Island. Did you ever encounter 'strange, strongly depleted' isotopic values that could not be explained by the topography of Big Island? I ask as such data were reported from other Hawaiian islands. I am not a specialist on stable isotopes, so apologize my ignorance. But, why do you base your analysis on ?18O and not on ?D which is less prone to water-rock exchange than ?18O? All the best - Rolf Kipfer (RoKi)


Submitted by Connor Newman on
Thanks for the interesting presentation, I particularly enjoyed how you used the two end-member explanations for mixing along a flow path or essentially piston flow. I am wondering how the isotopic variation observed in your sampling corresponds to the groundwater age? I also watched the presentation on CFCs and carbon dating and it seemed like some of your areas of isotopically depleted samples corresponded to anomalies noted by the age dating. In addition to tracking along with elevation, latitude, and continentality, the water isotopes may be enriched or depleted based on climatic conditions at the time of recharge (although you did not observe seasonal variability within the 3 years in your study). Sometimes I see investigations where depleted water isotopes are interpreted to be representative of old water (although that may be an over simplification in some instances). I'm wondering how the datasets of your study and the age-dating study match up. Thanks for your work.


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