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  • Early Career Events

    The Early career event program provides opportunities for less senior scientists to network and learn from volunteers from the community.

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    Pre- and post-conference field trips

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    Details of the upcoming social events at Goldschmidt2018

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    Pre-conference workshops

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    Accommodation in student halls at Boston University

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    Offsite locations for various events

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    The conference has special rates at several hotels in close proximity to the Hynes Convention Center. We encourage you to book early, as there are a limited number of rooms available.

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Workshops

Pre-conference workshops

Workshop Details

Mineral-Hosted Melt Inclusion: How Do We Read The Stories They Have To Tell?

Mineral-Hosted Melt Inclusion: How Do We Read The Stories They Have To Tell?

Friday 10th August 09:00 - Sunday 12th August 17:00
Contacts: Estelle Rose-Koga, Paul Wallace, Anne-Sophie Bouvier, Glenn Gaetani
Website

This workshop is being held at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. Registration and payment for this workshop is being managed directly by the workshop organisers. Registration will open in late January 2018. TO BOOK A PLACE ON THIS COURSE PLEASE CLICK THE WEBSITE LINK ABOVE. Small pockets of melt entrapped within growing mineral grains (mineral-hosted melt inclusions) are commonly used to study everything from mantle heterogeneity to pre-eruptive magmatic volatiles. The information recorded in melt inclusions is unique because entrapped melts are physically shielded from most interactions with the external environment by the host mineral. Melt inclusion studies require careful sample preparation, application of state-of-the-art analytical methods, and meticulous attention to potential artifacts related to post-entrapment processes. As analytical techniques progress and our understanding of post-entrapment processes evolve, it is important that the rapidly growing melt inclusion community periodically assess the state of the field. This workshop provides those who study melt inclusions – or would like to – with the opportunity take stock of available analytical tools and protocols for dealing with complications such as post-entrapment crystallization, diffusive re-equilibration, and the presence of vapor bubbles. Specific topics to be discussed include: What are the relative strengths and weaknesses of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometry, and laser-ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry? What are best practices for reconstructing total CO2 when vapor bubbles are present? How reliable are H2O concentrations and the oxidation state of Fe recorded in melt inclusions? One objective of the workshop is to develop guidelines for publication of data from melt inclusion studies to be summarized in a collegial manuscript that the organizers will submit for publication shortly after the workshop.


MSA Short Course: High Temperature Gas – Solid Reactions in Earth and Planetary Processes

Friday 10th August 09:00 - Sunday 12th August 17:00
Contacts: Penny King, Australian National University, Terry Seward, Victoria University, Wellington, Alex Speer
Website

BOOKING OPEN IN JANUARY 2018. Registration and payment for this workshop is being managed directly by MSA. TO BOOK A PLACE ON THIS COURSE PLEASE CLICK ON THE WEBSITE LINK ABOVE. The goal of this Short Course is to review, update and synthesize the current knowledge of high temperature gas-solid reactions relevant to the geosciences. In addition, we aim to grow research area that has previously received little attention, yet is critical for advancing our understanding of magmatic systems, planet evolution and industrial processes. Graduate students, researchers and geoscientists are warmly welcome to attend the Short Course which will be accompanied by a Reviews in Mineralogy and Geochemistry Volume. Early registration is $350 for a professional and $250 for a student.


Reactive Transport Modeling in Geochemical Systems

Reactive Transport Modeling in Geochemical Systems

Saturday 11th August 08:00 - Sunday 12th August 17:00
Contacts: Craig Bethke, Jenny Druhan, University of Illinois, Brian Farrell, Aqueous Solutions Llc, Melika Sharifi, University of Notre Dame, Kate Maher, Stanford University
Website
Price: US$140

Please join us for two days of hands-on training in reactive transport modeling using The Geochemist's Workbench®. Following a fully hands-on format, you will learn to construct, trace, and interpret models of transport in reacting geochemical systems. Specific topics covered include: an introduction to geochemical modeling; transport in flowing groundwater; dual porosity models (stagnant zones); Kd, Freundlich, and Langmuir sorption; surface complexation; colloid-facilitated transport; reaction kinetics; biodegradation; dissolution and precipitation; microbial catalysis and growth; effective graphical presentation; and creating animation and video. The topics will be illustrated by the instructors through a series of case studies.


Calcium Isotope Workshop – Building Community, Discussing Research Directions, and Evaluating New Technologies

Saturday 11th August 09:00-17:00
Contacts: Matthew Fantle, Juraj Farkas, Elizabeth Griffith, Theo Tacail
Website
Price: US$20

The aim of this one-day workshop is to bring together people interested in the application of calcium (Ca) isotopes to topics relevant within the earth and environmental sciences, as well as biomedicine and archeology. We recognize that a cohesive, well-connected research community is best able to solve a range of problems, promote the use of Ca isotopes, and push proxy development forward. The workshop will promote active discussion focused on the themes listed below. Themes for the workshop: 1) New Developments and Old Issues in Ca Isotope Analysis 2) Elucidating Geochemical Cycles at Local, Regional, and Global Scales using Ca Isotopes 3) Ca Isotopes in Deep Time: Potential and Limitations 4) Numerical Modeling of Ca Isotopes in Terrestrial and Marine Settings 5) New Frontiers in Ca Isotope Geochemistry Each participant should prepare a 1-slide presentation that fits within one of the themes, highlighting a particular question, topic, or problem that can be discussed in breakout discussion groups. It is our hope that the workshop will serve as platform for the development of a Ca isotope community. This includes the improvement of interpersonal relationships in an informal setting, the formation of new research collaborations, the community-wide adoption of solutions to common problems, and the enunciation of key future research directions. Though not included in the Saturday workshop, there will be an opportunity for informal lab tours/instrument demos at Harvard after Goldschmidt by both Nu and Thermo.


Computational thermodynamics and fluid dynamics with the ENKI software portal: An introduction aimed at early career researchers

Computational thermodynamics and fluid dynamics with the ENKI software portal: An introduction aimed at early career researchers

Saturday 11th August 09:00 - Sunday 12th August 17:00
Contacts: Mark S. Ghiorso, Marc W. Spiegelman, Columbia University, Aaron S. Wolf, University of Michigan
Price: US$140

This workshop will provide a hands-on survey of software and modeling tools available at the ENKI-portal. ENKI is an on-going project funded by the National Science Foundation that provides software tools and a computational ecosystem for geochemical simulations that are based on thermodynamics and fluid dynamics. ENKI is aimed at students and researchers interested in using, creating, and maintaining models and in developing interconnected scientific modeling frameworks. We will introduce the capabilities of ENKI and demonstrate how thermodynamic calculations like phase diagrams, pseudosections, geothermobarometers, and mass transfer calculations (MELTS, EQ6, DEW) can be rapidly and easily computed. We will also show how thermochemical databases can be utilized to support fluid dynamical simulations. ENKI currently supports a number of thermodynamic databases and solution model collections, including those of Berman, Holland and Powell, Stixrude and Lithgow-Bertelloni, MELTS, DEW and SUPCRT. Participants will learn how these databases can be extended or recalibrated in light of new data or insights using the model calibration infrastructure provided by ENKI. Attendees will need a laptop for this workshop for real-time access to the ENKI server portal.


Geochemical Modelling WorkshopUsing PHREEQC for laboratory and industrial applications

Saturday 11th August 09:00 - Sunday 12th August 17:00
Contacts: Julien Declercq, Rob Bowell
Price: US$350

Full details (PDF)

This two day workshop will provide an introduction to geochemical modelling and the USGS geochemical / thermodynamic modelling code PHREEQC (PH, REdox, EQuilibrium, Code). PHREEQC is a free, well-supported software code and one of the most, if not the most, widely used code amongst academia and industry for thermodynamic modelling applications. During the two day workshop, we will present the different geochemical modelling steps, from the definition of a conceptual model to the geochemical calculations within PHREEQC. We will also present exercises drawn from the presenters’ experiences, both in a laboratory setting and applied industrial setting. The workshop will take place in four sessions split over the two days. The first day will provide an introduction to geochemical models, the conceptualisation of the problems, and an overview of the thermodynamics that govern PHREEQC and the definitions within the databases. We will make a point of discussing the thermodynamic databases available within PHREEQC, their issues and the possible ways to overcome these. We will also provide the basic skills needed to use PHREEQC, including the definition of inputs and outputs, of solid and aqueous solutions, and of the reactions and equilibrium calculations. The second day will provide a more in-depth look at the possibilities offered by PHREEQC in terms of kinetic, transport, and sorption calculations. The aim is to develop an understanding of how to extract the equations defining the reactivity of mineralogical phases from the literature or experimental data and integrate these into PHREEQC. We will then show you how to use sorption experiments to define attenuation equations and sorption blocks in the program and provide an introduction to transport simulations. The workshop will finish with a general discussion.


LA-ICP-MS U-Th-Pb Network shortcourse - Saturday Only

Saturday 11th August 09:00-17:00
Contacts: Simon Jackson, Paul Sylvester, George Gehrels, Matthew Horstwood
Price: US$70

New community-derived standards in data reporting and uncertainty propagation for LA-ICP-MS U-Th-Pb geochronology were recently published. This shortcourse will detail these new recommendations, their significance for workflow and assist practitioners in their implementation. Improvements will be highlighted which result from implementing these new recommendations, particularly in understanding the comparison of sample ages at different levels of uncertainty propagation. This shortcourse is open to all active practitioners of U-Th-Pb geochronology.


Metasomatism and ore deposits in the Earth’s crust: experimental and modeling methods

Metasomatism and ore deposits in the Earth’s crust: experimental and modeling methods

Saturday 11th August 09:00 - Sunday 12th August 17:00
Contacts: Alexander P. Gysi (Colorado School of Mines), Daniel Harlov (GFZ Potsdam), Dmitrii A. Kulik (PSI, Switzerland), George D. Miron (PSI, Switzerland)
Website
Price: US$230

This two-day NSF-sponsored workshop includes hands-on tutorials, lectures, and discussions about current numerical thermodynamic modeling methods, the databases required, and the experimental approaches used for studying metal transport associated with hydrothermal fluid-rock interaction in the crust coupled with examples from nature. The goal of this workshop is to link thermodynamic modeling and experimental approaches, and bring together a broad community interested in the interpretation of crustal metasomatism and ore-forming processes. Participants in the workshop will be provided with a memory stick, which contains the free software, thermodynamic databases, tutorials and relevant references covered. The workshop is intended for graduate students, researchers, and professionals whom want to learn how to apply the GEMS code package (http://gems.web.psi.ch) to geochemical modeling, as well as learn about how to use current experimental methods regarding fluid-rock equilibria at elevated P-T conditions. The GEMS code package is based on Gibbs energy minimization, and provides a user friendly framework for predicting mass transfer in complex non-ideal systems such as those associated with fluid-rock interaction and ore-forming processes. The workshop will cover: 1) fundamentals of the GEM-Selektor code package and thermodynamic databases for simulating fluid-rock systems; 2) the GEMSFITS parameter optimization tool for optimizing thermodynamic properties against experimental data; 3) an overview of experimental advances in the study of the stability and mobility of metasomatically induced and altered REE mineral phases in crustal rocks (e.g. monazite, xenotime, apatite, allanite, and titanite); 4) field case studies of metasomatism and associated REE mineral deposits. The first day of the workshop will cover 1) and 2). Here participants will learn the tools necessary to simulate fluid-rock equilibria at high P-T conditions and how to retrieve the parameters for geochemical modeling. These tools include the GEMS code package, which is supported by a tutorial series for different ore-forming processes (e.g., Greisen tin deposits), and by the MINES thermodynamic database (http://tdb.mines.edu). The second day of the workshop will cover 3) and 4). Here participants will be introduced to the experimental methods and field examples necessary for studying the solubility and speciation of REE in crustal fluids. Short discussion sessions will be included in order for the audience to find connections between the content of the workshop and their own particular interests in crustal fluid-rock interaction, including examples from both nature and experiments. More information about the workshop will be available on the web link above in due time.


Nanoscience in the Earth and Environmental Sciences—From Theory to Practice

Nanoscience in the Earth and Environmental Sciences—From Theory to Practice

Saturday 11th August 09:00 - Sunday 12th August 17:00
Contacts: David Mogk, Jim Ranville, Michael Hochella
Website
Price: US$140

Nanoscience is a frontier area of research that provides abundant opportunities in many different scientific and engineering disciplines. Currently, the Earth and environmental sciences are underrepresented in their participation in this revolutionary field of study, which currently contributes to nano-enabled products worth roughly $1 trillion annually! There is currently an amazing arsenal of analytical methods that are available to characterize the identity, morphology, composition (bulk and surface), chemical state, atomic structure and related chemical and physical properties of nanoparticles. This workshop will focus on practical aspects of using this instrumentation (e.g., AFM and Electron microscopy, surface analysis, fractionation methods, ICP-MS, light-scattering, among many others) in doing nanogeoscience. Topics to be covered include sample collection in the field, sample preparation/preservation, and instrumental data acquisition, reduction, and representation. The workshop will include invited presentations, group discussions, and hands-on demonstrations of modern software packages applied to authentic datasets. Instrument vendors will be invited to demonstrate their latest operating systems. Participants are encouraged to bring examples of their own procedures and protocols to demonstrate to the group and receive feedback. Outcomes of this workshop will be an online "toolkit" of methods and procedures that will be available for use by the entire community in research and instruction. Opportunities to participate in the US National Nanotechnology Coordinated Infrastructure program will also be described.


Quantitative Compositional Mapping of Geological Materials using XMapTools

Quantitative Compositional Mapping of Geological Materials using XMapTools

Saturday 11th August 09:00 - Sunday 12th August 17:00
Contacts: Pierre Lanari, Tom Raimondo
Website
Price: US$200

Over the last decade, quantitative compositional mapping has emerged as a powerful technique to aid petrological interpretations. Chemical maps of major, minor and trace elements can both depict the spatial distribution of each mineral phase and capture their compositional variability at the micro-scale. However, computer tools are required to calibrate the maps and to produce numerical datasets that enable quantitative investigation of specific petrological processes. The software solution XMapTools is at the cutting edge of progress in this sector, and aims to simplify the data processing by providing statistical toolboxes and functions embedded in a user-friendly graphical user interface. This two-day workshop is chiefly designed as an XMapTools beginner course, where participants will be introduced to the software and learn how to use it routinely. It will involve a series of lectures and practicals from XMapTools developers and experts that explore a variety of applications of quantified map data, including integrated computation of P-T estimates, identification of mineral growth and dissolution events, and assessment of geochemical mobility during fluid-rock interaction. The participants will have the opportunity to learn how to calibrate and analyze compositional maps acquired by both EPMA and LA-ICP-MS. This course will provide an important foundation accessible to high-level undergraduate students, graduate students, and professional researchers who are using or planning to use quantitative compositional maps in their own studies.


The Magma Chamber Simulator, a phase equilibria modelling tool for magma recharge, crustal assimilation and crystallization (RAFC)

The Magma Chamber Simulator, a phase equilibria modelling tool for magma recharge, crustal assimilation and crystallization (RAFC)

Saturday 11th August 09:00 - Sunday 12th August 17:00
Contacts: Frank Spera, Wendy Bohrson
Website
Price: US$210

Please join us for a two-day workshop on the Magma Chamber Simulator (MCS) on August 11 and 12. The Magma Chamber Simulator is an energy- and mass-constrained computer code (Bohrson et al. 2014) that simultaneously models recharge/magma mixing, crustal assimilation and crystal fractionation (RAFC). For a crustal magma body, MCS tracks the thermal, mass, and compositional (major and trace element, isotope, and phase equilibria) evolution as magma undergoes RAFC. During the first day of this workshop, participants will do hands-on exercises that will familiarize them with running (e.g., input, steps to run code) the Magma Chamber Simulator (major and trace elements, radiogenic isotopes, and phase equilibria), and archiving and effectively utilizing output. The second day will involve modelling specific scenarios (e.g., RAFC, AFC, RFC) so participants can develop an understanding of how to effectively model their own data. Small group or one-on-one training will be available. We welcome petrologists at all levels: students, early career professionals and middle and later career professionals too! With training in this two-day workshop, students (undergraduate and graduate students) can master the use of the code. MCS can also be used in the classroom or lab, so we welcome those who are interested in integrating MCS into their petrology/geochemistry classes. If you have already taken an MCS workshop, please consider joining us in Boston for additional training; we will provide separate training to experienced users who wish to get feedback on specific questions/modelling challenges and/or who would like to learn how to implement the trace element/isotope module of MCS. For more information about MCS, please go to: http://mcs.geol.ucsb.edu/, or contact one of the conveners We hope to see you in Boston!


Active Learning and Digital Ed:  Leveling Up Your Classroom Game

Active Learning and Digital Ed: Leveling Up Your Classroom Game

Sunday 12th August 09:00-17:00
Contacts: Lev Horodyskyj, Ariel Anbar
Price: US$70

Almost all geoscientists working in an academic setting are required to teach. Traditionally, the go-to approach for teaching has been lecture-exam. With the push for more online teaching, this ineffective method of teaching has been translated into ineffective online courses. What if there was a better way? Active learning and digital technologies can help bring a moribund lecture classroom to life, engage students, and achieve better outcomes. We will review the research on active learning and digital education, show examples of this type of learning done right, and work with workshop participants to transform their lessons and lesson concepts into next generation teaching activities using a variety of analog and digital tools.


Data Science in Geochemistry

Data Science in Geochemistry

Sunday 12th August 09:00-17:00
Contacts: Lesley Wyborn, Jens Klump, Peter Fox, Megan Carter, Kerstin Lehnert
Price: US$40/US$20

The rapidly growing volume of geochemical data that are accessible in online synthesis databases and the availability of new information and computing technology together provide geoscientists with new ways to explore, mine, visualize, and analyze geochemical data. This workshop is intended to provide opportunities for researchers, especially early career scientists, to learn about geochemical data resources and tools for mining, visualizing, and statistically analyzing the data, and to explore additional software tools and data resources that advance data science in geochemistry. The workshop will include brief introductions to fundamental aspects of geochemical data management and data access in geochemistry, and provide time for participants to think creatively and design new ways to use and interact with the data and develop research applications. Participants will be encouraged to contribute scientific use cases around which breakout groups can form. The price is $40 and $20 at the student rate.


Extraction strategies and procedures applied to organic compounds from a variety of matrices

Extraction strategies and procedures applied to organic compounds from a variety of matrices

Sunday 12th August 09:00-17:00
Contacts: Calum Morrison
Price: US$120

This one day workshop will comprise lectures, tutorials and opportunities for short class discussion and may be of particular value to early career researchers. The workshop will focus on methods and strategies for extraction of mainly organic molecules from a variety of matrices. We will briefly review some of the techniques including solid phase micro extraction and related technologies, solid phase extraction, solvent extraction and newer/combined developments. Other preparation processes including chemical derivatisation and a brief mention of instrumental techniques (GCMS, LCMS etc) will be covered if required for clarity and putting overall discussion into context. Examples of extraction will be illustrated from a variety of subject areas with an emphasis on molecule type, method development / approaches and important applications. Some examples include drugs, volatile hydrocarbons, pesticides, fatty acids, amines and related molecules from biological, environmental and food matrices. The workshop will finish with a discussion session to sum up key points from the day.


Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry, Mixture Complexity and Data Interpretation

Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry, Mixture Complexity and Data Interpretation

Sunday 12th August 09:00-17:00
Contacts: François-Régis Orthous-Daunay
Website
Price: US$70

Theme: The measurement of the exact mass of a molecule with high enough resolution and accuracy brings the chemical analysis to a new scale of interpretation. The access granted to the full stoichiometric content of a large variety of mixtures requires new dedicated tools for description and analysis. In Earth and Planetary Science fields, FT-MS is becoming the technique of choice for 4 main purposes: Isotopic and elemental composition Molecular and structure identification Chemical patterns and mixture complexity Variability in time and space Each point raises typical issues with peculiar algorithmic solutions. This workshop is an invitation for researchers to present how they find trustworthy molecular formulas from exact masses, interpret MS² fragmentation patterns, compare hundreds of spectra in time (chromatography) or space (mapping) or describe the complexity of a mixture itself. We will focus on the intimate link between the analytical tools and the scientific goals, trying to bring out similarities, regardless of the actual field in which measurement are carried out. Content: The workshop will focus on the description of the different tools used by different groups. Each theme will be illustrated by a couple of speakers presenting a particular issue and how it is solved. Live demonstration of tool performances are encouraged and should be part of discussions as well.


Isotope Ratio Measurements, Metrology, and the SI

Isotope Ratio Measurements, Metrology, and the SI

Sunday 12th August 09:00-17:00
Contacts: Robert Vocke, Savelas Rabb, Lesley Chesson, Rebecca Kraft, Yuri Amelin
Price: US$100

Isotopic reference materials (iRMs) connect us, whether you are adding data to the canon of paleoenvironmental reconstruction, doing the first measurements in a non-traditional isotope system or seeking the oldest surviving crustal artefacts. Please join us for a workshop on the status of iRMs and how to improve them. The program will include invited lectures from a wide variety of disciplines and techniques such as: non-traditional isotopes, forensics, geochronology, noble gases, atmospheric sciences, clumped isotopes, laser ablation, et cetera. Experts will discuss status of measurements in their field, the iRMs that support their work, and anticipated future iRM and instrumentation needs. With the redefinition of the kilogram and the mole taking place in 2018, this is the perfect time and venue to increase the scientific understanding and cooperation between metrologists and bio/geochemists. Expected outcomes from this workshop will be a better understanding of the crucial role iRMs play in our science as well as a deeper insight into the very real diversity of needs within the iRM community. Participants will have the opportunity to voice their concerns in characterizing the needs of the isotope ratio measurement community and drafting potential solutions. Brought to you by the Isotopic Reference Materials Working Group.


LA-ICP-MS U-Th-Pb Network workshop - Sunday Only

Sunday 12th August 09:00-17:00
Contacts: Simon Jackson, Paul Sylvester, George Gehrels, Matthew Horstwood
Price: US$70

The initial results for two experiments targeted to improve LA-ICP-MS U-Th-Pb geochronology were discussed at the Goldschmidt 2015 workshop in Prague. New data and updated interpretations for both experiments will now be discussed. The first experiment describes results from a comparison of a single dataset processed through the more commonly available processing software tools. Particular questions we are looking to address include: How significant are the biases introduced by different data processing packages and where do they occur in the processing workflow? What level of uncertainty do these contribute to community results and are the uncertainty outputs of the different processing tools the same? The second experiment describes the biases seen by different LA-ICP-MS laboratories for a range of commonly available zircon U-Th-Pb reference materials. This ‘offset plot’ experiment looks to address whether the same magnitude and polarity of bias is seen by all labs for the same reference materials. Do we all see the same biases and what are their cause? The results of these community experiments have the potential to significantly improve our understanding of the total uncertainty budget for LA-ICP-MS U-Th-Pb geochronology and where significant improvements can be made. We will discuss these issues and highlight improvements to common practice that should lead to improved performance across the LA-ICP-MS U-Th-Pb community.


Rare Element Deposit Associated with Coal Workshop

Rare Element Deposit Associated with Coal Workshop

Sunday 12th August 09:00-17:00
Contacts: Prof. Dr. Yuzhuang Sun, Prof. Dr. S.I. Arbuzov, Prof. Dr. Prakash Kumar Singh, Prof. Dr. R.B. Finkelman, Cunliang Zhao
Price: US$100

Full details (PDF)

More and more anomalous enrichments of rare elements such as Ga, Li, Ge, Nb (Ta)-Ree, Th-U, Rb-Cs-Sc, and Au in coal were found around the world coal deposits. In some case, it can reach levels equal to or even higher than their concentrations in many conventional types of respective ores. Workshop on rare trace elements deposit associated with coal will cover on some basic information and new developments, such as: the definition of this new deposit, the distribution of this deposit around the world, the concentration, occurrence, enrichment mechanism of rare elements in coal. And some case, significant enrichments of rare elements associated with coal deposit in China, Russia, India, and so on will be detailed explanation. Moreover, update on extract technologies of valuable elements from coal ashes will be introduced. The workshop is oriented to PhD students, postdocs and research scientists. We hope that the workshop will help developing the key future research direction on geochemistry of rare elements in coal.


Oral Presentation Skills for Students

Oral Presentation Skills for Students

Sunday 12th August 12:30-17:00
Contacts: Alice Williams
Price: US$25

Giving a presentation at Goldschmidt can be a daunting prospect, particularly for those who are presenting at an international conference for the first time or whose first language is not English. During this afternoon workshop, students will have the opportunity to practise, get feedback, and work on their Goldschmidt talks in small groups led by young anglophone scientists experienced in giving oral presentations. The course will be a half-day and will be held in the Hynes centre so those attending can best prepare to give their talks in the same set up as will be used in the conference. Specific help and guidance will be provided for students whose first language is not English, and group leaders will be trained and coordinated by a professional English language instructor. A workshop manual will be provided in advance to help students design and prepare their presentations before arriving in Boston. Priority will be given to students giving an oral presentation at Goldschmidt2018. This course is supported by the GS.


Finding a Position Inside Academia/Opportunities Outside of Academia

Sunday 12th August 13:00-16:30
Price: US$25

This event is made up of two seminars, each runs twice and delegates can attend in either order. All tickets are for both seminars. Seminars run in adjacent rooms.

Finding a Position in Academia
13:00-14:30 and 15:00-16:30
How do professors get hired? What key things should you be promoting when looking for a position? And once you find a position how do you navigate building a research program, developing a teaching portfolio, and succeeding in being promoted? Join a range of panelists with the aim to de-mystify the process, and share secrets to success. This workshop is geared towards graduate students and post-docs considering an academic career.

Opportunities Outside of Academia
13:00-14:30 and 15:00-16:30
Finding a position outside of academia can seem mysterious. For instance, what do businesses favor in terms of experience relative to an academic institution? In this workshop, speak directly with successful post-graduates navigating careers in industry, policy, research laboratories, state agencies, and private enterprise. Get practical advice and tips on landing a career that is right for you.

Mid-afternoon refreshments will be provided at the swap point.


White Iron Conferences Limited, a company registered in England, No. 10437336. Registered address: 11 Sturton Street, Cambridge, CB1 2SN, UK. Tel: +44 1223 852663. Email: helpdesk@goldschmidt.info

Goldschmidt® is a registered trademark of the European Association of Geochemistry and of the Geochemical Society

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